It’s now been two years since I walked across the stage, shook the administrators’ hands, and received my doctorate degree. I remember thinking, “Yes, I did it!” Things were looking up for me, I had a job lined up, I was a new mom, and finally free from school and all the unpleasant things associated with it (like sitting in seminar meetings). Two years later, I have a much different…

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Grad students have a hard time keeping the lines between school and home separate. When your advisor finally emails you back, it feels like you need to be ready no matter what you’re doing. However, given what we know about work-nonwork conflict, grad students should proceed with caution. How Work-Nonwork Conflict Can Be a Downer Allowing work-related activities to creep into your home life can lead to more stress…

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In a previous post, I wrote about a few general strategies to use while taking notes in graduate school.  Those methods included digitally and manually taking notes and the pros and cons of each.  With this second post, I wanted to provide a short list of tips for taking notes while in grad school.  These will help you hone your note-taking skills and become more organized with your…

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Graduate school can be overwhelming, as most of you already know.  There are classes and seminars to attend, research to do, labs to complete, exams to study for, and comps to take.  I’m sure if there was something that could make your routine easier, you’d be up for it, right?  Well, here’s your chance to simplify your life, if only just a little bit, by learning which method of…

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Sent a draft to your advisor and got it back dripping with red ink? Does it mean that you should quit? Not at all! How, then, should you handle negative feedback from your advisor? Don’t take it personally. If your advisor is highly critical of your work, you should not take the criticism as an attack on your academic aptitude, intelligence, or abilities. It’s not like your advisor is…

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Teaching has changed dramatically with the advent of the smart phone. Perhaps you actively encourage students to Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), or maybe you’ve given up on trying to police students’ behavior in the classroom. Either way, your educational goals may ultimately be tempered by this one course policy. Problems with BYOD Some college professors have long battled the use of cell phones or other electronic devices in…

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There is no question that you will need to work with others in order to be successful in grad school. If you know a little bit about personality theory, you will not only be able to predict how people will react in various situations, but you will also be able to use your own personality tendencies to increase productivity. Before you run a personality assessment on yourself or your advisor,…

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Feel like your advisor is working you into the ground? Perhaps you have come to the conclusion that graduate programs have complete disregard for their students’ personal lives and that they intentionally and ruthlessly work their students like slaves. I won’t attempt to deny these accusations, but I do believe in seeing the bright side to any unfortunate situation. Below I’ve outlined a little pep talk to encourage you on…

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Sometimes, graduate students want to learn something new and step back from the monotony of their field of study.  Apps like the ones I will discuss can provide opportunities for you to learn something new in an environment that is conducive to your lifestyle. You might recognize the following apps from previous school subjects (or present, in case you see your own major here), but don’t let this…

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If you are going to retweet, friend, follow, or otherwise connect with your students on social media, make an informed decision about this one ethical boundary in which many institutions provide little guidance. What Do Students Think? First, the popularity of the professor matters in what students think is appropriate. Unsurprisingly, students are reluctant to friend unknown or disliked professors (Karl & Peluchette, 2011), but not popular and well-liked professors…

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