I am fairly statistically savvy.  In fact, I have an MS in Statistics that I received before enrolling in the PhD program I am in now.  I am currently working on my dissertation and am having a problem with my chair.  Overall, he’s been very supportive and helpful, but when it comes to his recommendations for chapter four, there are a lot of things that he is asking for that are just wrong.  What’s the best way to tell the chair – the person most responsible for whether or not I finish my dissertation – that he is wrong?  At the same time, I cannot just follow him as he runs amuck with my dissertation data. –Stuck on Statistics Dear Stuck on Statistics, The first thing that you want to be aware of is that this is a delicate situation. You definitely wouldn’t want to come right out and tell your chair that he is wrong in his suggestions to you. The second thing that you want to realize is that your relationship with your chair is such an important one that you want to keep civil and not hostile in any way. If you try to convince him that he is wrong, then you may ruin this important bond that should remain healthy with him.

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Student success is something that is on every graduate students mind, especially considering that going to graduate school is a huge time and financial commitment. Students need to be ready and prepared to tackle this intense process, and the best way to do this is to prepare themselves as an undergraduate. While you are an undergraduate, you should master time management, study, and self-discipline skills because these skills will…

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What is one piece of advice for graduate students that we are most commonly asked for? How to stand out from other students and make themselves the most marketable of the group. There is no doubt about it: competition is intense and stakes are high in graduate school. Increased competition and stakes will follow you after graduate school as you apply for jobs, especially because you will have to compete…

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